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ND alumni included in ‘Best American Essays’

first_imgThe editors of the 2013 “Best American Essays” collection, an annual anthology showcasing exceptional essays by American authors, recognized works by three contributors to “Notre Dame Magazine” in this year’s installment. “His Last Game,” by Brian Doyle, editor of the University of Portland’s “Portland Magazine” and a 1978 Notre Dame alumnus, will appear in the newest volume of “The Best American Essays.” “Wintry Rooms of Love,” by Mel Livatino, a longtime writer, and “My Life in Clothes,” by Kerry Temple, editor of “Notre Dame Magazine” and a 1974 alumnus, will be included in the “Notable Essays” list. Doyle said “His Last Game” depicts two brothers playing a game of pickup basketball and going on a drive through familiar neighborhoods. “[The essay was written] to connect, to tell a story that sings of my brother and all brothers and grace and courage and hoops and pain and laughter and attentiveness and love and loss,” Doyle said. Doyle said he was shocked the selection committee chose his essay for the collection. “You want to be read, you want to connect, you want to startle hearts, and I think the essay is the coolest most direct, naked and honest form, the one closest to the speaking voice, closest to how we think inside,” Doyle said. As a student at Notre Dame, Doyle said he studied English and enjoyed hearing and sharing stories.”I had to read lots of voices and sorts and styles of tale-telling and not just reportage,” Doyle said. “I also loved history and theater as forms of storytelling. English is a great major in that it is really story-catching and story-sharing.” Doyle said he was not surprised two additional essays from “Notre Dame Magazine” were recognized in “The Best American Essays.” “‘Notre Dame Magazine’ is not only one of the 10 best in the nation every year, but it has superb writing,” Doyle said. “Kerry Temple is a very fine editor, indeed. I sometimes wonder if Notre Dame appreciates him as much as the rest of the world does.” Temple said for more than 30 years, he has been deeply involved in the creative process of “Notre Dame Magazine,” reading, writing and reviewing the work of artistic, contemplative and brilliant minds concerning subjects from spirituality to scientific breakthroughs. “Our subject matter is as wide-ranging as the conversations found on a college campus, at a university that cares about the great questions of the day,” Temple said. “That’s one of the best aspects of ‘Notre Dame Magazine,’ of working here. And when we take on those questions, we reflect Notre Dame’s guiding lights – the moral, ethical, spiritual dimensions of all issues.” Temple said his essay, “My Life in Clothes,” explores how clothing can define people, for better or for worse. He said knowing a reader has appreciated his work is comforting. “It’s always great to get the affirmation, especially in that venue,” Temple said. “It’s the 10th time something I’ve done has been cited among the ‘Notable Essays,’ and this was especially fun because it was an offbeat topic.” Livatino said he is also happy to have his essays recognized, as he views each essay as an adventure with an unknown payoff, not the least of which is the writing process itself. Livatino’s essay, “Wintry Rooms of Love” explores the hard-hitting tragedy of losing parents and other loved ones to death while embracing the love that brings ‘summer’ to counteract the cold feelings of ‘winter.’ It was Livatino’s first essay to be included in “Notre Dame Magazine,” he said. Livatino said the process of writing is  steeped in emotion and centered in communicating life’s important messages. “I don’t really set goals when I write,” he said. “I catch a sight of something out of the corner of my eye, something that intrigues me and that I really want to see fully, and then I begin writing. That initial shiver of emotion pulls me in.” Doyle said stories have a powerful, communal dimensiot. “The best stories are not about you. They are about us,” he said. “Ask people about their joys and pain and grace and listen carefully to their stories. Stories are food. Stories are holy.” Contact Charlie Ducey at cducey@nd.edulast_img read more

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‘Non-consensual sexual contact’ incident reported on Eddy Street

first_imgThe Notre Dame Police Department (NDPD) announced in an email to the campus community Wednesday a report of “non-consensual sexual contact.” The alleged incident took place on Eddy Street Commons outside of Brothers Bar & Grill early Sunday morning, according to the email.The reported incident involved a male, who has not yet been identified, “inappropriately and non-consensually touching” a female student. The male is thought to be of student age and was described as “a white male with sandy blonde hair, no facial hair, blue eyes, 5 feet 7 to 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a slender build,” according to the email.The email said the victim reported the assailant had an Australian accent, but it is not clear if it was genuine. He also reportedly approached several other women in the area around the time of the incident.The NDPD has been in touch with the Saint Joseph County Special Victims Unit regarding the incident. Any individuals with information are encouraged to report it to the Saint Joseph County Special Victims Unit.Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault are available online from NDPD and the Title IX office.Tags: Eddy Street Commons, NDPD, Non-consensual sexual contact, St. Joseph County Police Department, Title IXlast_img read more

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China Daily: ‘Taking Energy in the Right Direction’

first_imgChina Daily: ‘Taking Energy in the Right Direction’ FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享By IEEFA’s Tim Buckley in China Daily Asia:China has formally confirmed two new clean energy world records in 2015 — one for installing 32.5 gigawatts (GW) of wind in a single year, and the second for installing between 15 and 18 GW of solar.The Indian solar sector has started 2016 with a staggering development, that being a further 7 percent reduction in tariffs to a record low unsubsidized 4.34 rupees (6 cents) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) fixed flat for 25 years. This builds rapidly on the 20 percent decline achieved in 2015 alone (and an 80 percent decline in just five years).China’s figures confirm the country’s record-breaking shift toward renewable power and away from coal. Hydroelectricity, solar and wind continue to be the big winners, as illustrated by a 73.7 percent increase in grid-connected solar generation capacity.Declining consumption coupled with an overabundance of domestic supply meant coal imports into China were particularly badly hit and dropped 30.4 percent year-on-year.While these figures are largely consistent with initial estimates for 2015, the official National Bureau of Statistics of China confirmed, yet again, that the global electricity markets are transforming a great deal faster than anyone actually expected.Full article:  Taking Energy in the Right Directionlast_img read more

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One third of them means half of this?

first_imgKeep me honest. I’ve been known to ask for help in finding my sunglasses…while I’m wearing them. Hey, they’re lightweight and comfortable! So if I’m overlooking an important point, please guide me in the right direction. In this situation, I have a nagging feeling the industry is doing just that.We’re talking auto loans. Or rather, auto loan funding.If my data sources are correct, credit unions handle 16.7% of auto loans in America(1). Not too shabby. In fact, that’s a lot of loans, a whole bunch of cars, and millions of people receiving rates likely better than from a for-profit bank. Congratulations financial co-ops!Hold off on swinging the “We’re #1” foam finger for just another minute. A previous post celebrated an announcement from CUNA of credit union penetration. 1 in 3 Americans. 100 million members. So why only 16.7% of auto loans?Some digging ensued and it didn’t take long for the digital shovel to strike a proverbial wooden box. Upon opening it, I learned there was a leak in the ship.Credit unions do, in fact, accept auto loan applications for 33% of Americans. However, only around half ever get funded. That’s 50% or 1 in 2 members.What’s half of 33%? Not too far from 16.7%. Wait a minute, I’ve heard that number before! Isn’t that the total percentage of auto loans credit unions hold in the market? Weird, right?Could it be that credit unions are receiving all the applications they need, yet, for various reasons, are losing out to other lenders? Sure, you have high underwriting standards, and not everyone qualifies; you don’t need to rationalize to that end. However, there is still a loss. You’re putting effort into underwriting these loan applications; be bothered by losing half of them!From reducing flipped loans with the convenience of share drafts to the personal touch of a member representative calling on every loan approval, there are credit unions making strides to confront this issue. What are your numbers, and could reducing a portion of the lost half make a difference in your 2015 goals?Disclosure: My company works with credit unions to help increase booked loan percentages as well as their total auto loan volume. It is in our, and the industry’s, best interest to identify sources of lost income and maximize growth for institutions and their members.(1) Experian, Q3Y14 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Joe Winn What do you get when you mix auto loan programs with a desire to help others? Well, approaches that make a difference, of course. So what do you get when … Web: credituniongeek.com Detailslast_img read more

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30 ways to save money in October

first_img 74SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr With the warmth of summer fading and school back in session, October can be an expensive time of year. To help you save money this October, follow these 30 money-saving tips and ideas.1. Opt for a Fall VacationIf you frequently travel during the summer or winter months, you might want to opt for a fall vacation instead. October can be a great time to travel, as the month is wedged between the high travel periods of summer and Thanksgiving. Mountain destinations like Colorado, for example, offer gorgeous scenery any time of the year, but can be much cheaper in the fall with discounts on hotels and airfares. You can also take advantage of the shoulder season to pick up cheap flights and accommodations at exotic destinations overseas.2. Buy Your Ski Passes EarlyIf you’re planning on hitting the slopes come winter, then October is a great time to buy your ski passes, said Andrea Woroch, a consumer and money-saving expert. While most slopes won’t open until November, passes tend to get more expensive the later you purchase them. Many passes can even sell out, putting a rut in your plans. continue reading »last_img read more

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Keep up with reading over summer, kids told

first_imgNZ Herald 3 January 2014Parents are being urged to encourage their children to read over the summer in light of research showing kids who forgo books while on holiday lose reading ability at alarming rates.The loss in reading and learning levels over the holiday period can set children back by one month on average from before the summer break – meaning they return to school further behind classmates.The so-called “summer slide” can be cumulative – building over a number of years and greatly affecting future success and confidence.Massey University literacy specialist Professor Tom Nicholson said the problem was serious, but one that many parents were unaware of.United States research found that by the end of primary school those who did no reading over summer were two years behind in their reading, compared to peers who did read.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11381374last_img read more

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Abortion – I wasn’t offered an alternative

first_imgAdoption was never offered as an alternative to my abortionStuff co.nz 6 September 2018Family First Comment: “Twenty years later I saw a poster in a doctor’s office of the different stages of gestation. It was then that I realised I had been lied to. My baby would have had fingers, toes and a strong heart beat, and blood would have been running through its veins. At the time of my abortion consultation, not one medical professional spoke the truth to me or gave me options such as adoption. There was never any mention of an alternative support system to bring the baby to full term and then adopt him or her out. No one negotiated with me on behalf of the baby’s life.”www.chooselife.nzWarning: Some readers may find the content of this submission distressing. In my early 20s I fell pregnant. For many reasons, socially and personally, I felt I couldn’t go through with the pregnancy.I was devastated because I knew in my heart, there was someone little in my body growing and developing and I was planning to take its life.Ten weeks into my pregnancy I was booked in for a pre-abortion counselling meeting.For the entire meeting, I was inconsolable and when the counsellor asked why I was so upset, I explained how I felt. But the counsellor boldly told me that it was not really a baby at this time, just a bag of blood and tissue. This seemed to help calm me down a little as I sat through the consultation, ignorant to the actual facts.At the time, I didn’t think to look in a book myself to see exactly what size the baby was and just how developed it would be and the clinic certainly never had any pictures on the walls of the gestation sequence.After the consultation they gave me some Valium to relax and then sent me home. The following day, I took the pills again to numb my emotions and I went ahead with the abortion.Twenty years later I saw a poster in a doctor’s office of the different stages of gestation. It was then that I realised I had been lied to. My baby would have had fingers, toes and a strong heart beat, and blood would have been running through its veins.At the time of my abortion consultation, not one medical professional spoke the truth to me or gave me options such as adoption. There was never any mention of an alternative support system to bring the baby to full term and then adopt him or her out.No one negotiated with me on behalf of the baby’s life.Surely, before a woman has an abortion there should be a system in place for an alternative outcome to the pregnancy other than abortion.https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/106867819/adoption-was-never-offered-as-an-alternative-to-my-abortion?cid=app-iPhonelast_img read more

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Tilapia with Ginger-Marinated Cucumbers.

first_imgFood & DiningLifestyle Tilapia with Ginger-Marinated Cucumbers. by: – August 25, 2011 24 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Tilapia with Ginger-Marinated Cucumbers.This delicious seafood meal is a great refresher on hot summer days. The mild, slightly sweet flavors of tilapia go well with a side of cucumbers marinated in a minty ginger sauce.Top the fish off with a sweet yogurt blend for extra flavor and garnish with strips of lemon peel and cracked peppercorns.Calories 210, Total Fat 3 g, Saturated Fat 1 g, Monounsaturated Fat 1 g, Polyunsaturated Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 59 mg, Sodium 388 mg, Carbohydrate 23 g, Total Sugar 19 g, Fiber 0 g, Protein 26 g. Daily Values: Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 8%, Calcium 12%, Iron 10%. Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.Ingredients:1/2 cup cider vinegar1/4 cup + 1 teaspoon packed brown sugar2 tsp. grated fresh ginger1/2 tsp. salt2 medium cucumbers, sliced (about 3-1/2 cups)Nonstick cooking spray4 4-ounce tilapia fillets, 1/2 to 3/4-inch thick1 6-oz. carton plain yogurt2 Tbsp. coarsely chopped fresh mintStrips of lemon peel and lemon wedges, optionalCracked PeppercornsDirections:Preheat broiler. In a medium bowl stir together the vinegar, 1/4 cup brown sugar, ginger, and salt until sugar dissolves. Remove 1/4 cup of the mixture. Add cucumbers and half of the mint to remaining mixture; toss to coat and set aside.Lightly coat the rack of an unheated broiler pan with cooking spray; add tilapia. Brush the 1/4 cup vinegar mixture over the fish. Broil 4 inches from the heat for 4 to 6 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.Meanwhile, in another small bowl combine yogurt, remaining mint, and 1 teaspoon brown sugar.Use a slotted spoon to place cucumbers onto serving plates. Top with fish and yogurt mixture. Sprinkle with strips of lemon peel and cracked peppercorns. Serve with lemon wedges, if desired.Makes: 4 servingsPantry Items: cider vinegar brown sugar salt nonstick cooking spray pepper cornsRecipe source: Better Homes and Gardens Sharecenter_img Tweet Share Sharelast_img read more

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Good Hygiene Is Best Prevention Against D68

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS – While state health officials advise parents to be on the lookout for symptoms associated with the respiratory enterovirus known as EV-D68 sweeping the nation, they say good hygiene is the best prevention.Indiana hospitals statewide have seen increase in the number of children with respiratory viruses, but it remains unclear if it is related to D68.The enterovirus causes mild symptoms such as low-grade fever, cough, runny nose and body aches.Indiana State epidemiologist Pam Pontones says those with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions, such as asthma, may experience more severe complications requiring hospitalization.“Some of the more severe symptoms include wheezing and shortness of breath and difficulty speaking,” Pontones says. “So, someone who has developed symptoms of a cold that progress to that severity certainly needs to contact a health-care provider right away.”Hospitals statewide are reporting an increase in the number of children with respiratory illness, but Pontones says it’s unclear if it’s related to the recent surge of enterovirus D-68 infections in other states. While typically a common virus, this month it has been linked to the hospitalization of hundreds of children in Missouri and Illinois, and is suspected in several other states.The Indiana Health Department is working with local health departments and health-care providers to monitor for cases of enterovirus D-68 and the C-D-C is assisting with testing. Pontones says this type of surveillance is critical to rule out other respiratory illnesses.“The enterovirus D-68 being reported in other states is not treatable with anti-viral medication,” Pontones says. “There is no vaccine for it and because it is a virus antibiotics are not effective.”The best prevention, according to Pontones, is to practice good hygiene. She recommends frequent hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes, disinfecting common areas, not sharing utensils or drinking cups, and staying home from work or school if you feel ill.last_img read more

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Mrs. Judith E. “Judy” (McAlister) Firth

first_imgMrs. Judith E. “Judy” (McAlister) Firth, age 76, of Vevay, Indiana, entered this life on April 21, 1942, in Switzerland County, Indiana, the loving daughter of the late, Chester L. and Mavis M. (Reed) McAlister. She was raised in Switzerland and Ohio Counties, Indiana. She was a graduate of Switzerland County High School. Judy was united in marriage on June 27, 1964, at the Switzerland Baptist Church in Vevay, Indiana, to Charles A. “Charlie” Firth. This happy union was blessed with two daughters, Barbara and Jillanna. Judy and Charlie shared nearly 55 years of marriage together until her death. Together, Judy and Charlie worked on their farm in Center Square raising cattle, pigs, tobacco, hay and large vegetable gardens – much of which Judy preserved. She particularly enjoyed springtime and watching the newborn calves in the pasture.Judy was the former attendance secretary for the Switzerland County High School for five years. She served as the executive secretary and executive director for The Vevay-Switzerland County Foundation, retiring after 17 years of service. Judy served as a founding board member of the Community Foundation of Switzerland County and was a charter member of the Switzerland County YMCA Board of Directors. She also served on the board of the Lifetime Resources and Switzerland County Economical Development Commission. She was a member of the Vevay Kiwanis Club. As a lifelong resident of Switzerland County, Judy was well-known for her commitment and involvement throughout Switzerland County and was a strong advocate of investing in the community; making positive changes that would benefit all members.Judy was an amazing cook and baker, sewed countless Easter dresses for her girls and was a worthy opponent in Scrabble, cards and Yahtzee. Judy enjoyed gardening, bird watching, attending Broadway shows, traveling and spending time with her family. She loved walking on the beach in Florida, collecting seashells, watching the sunset and great seafood. Judy passed away with her loving family and faithful dog, Alex, by her side at 1:15 a.m., Friday, March 1, 2019, at her daughter’s residence in Indianapolis, Indiana. Judy’s family is comforted knowing that after her third battle with cancer, she is now at peace. There are no words to express how much Charlie, Barbara, Jillanna and Alex love and miss her and always will.Judy is also survived by her sister, Debra Hite of Vevay, IN; her brothers, Larry McAlister and his wife, Sharon of Bloomington, IN, Gary McAlister of Vevay, IN, John McAlister and his wife, Darla of Vevay, IN and Tony McAlister of Vevay, IN and several nieces, nephews and other relatives.She was preceded in death by her parents, Chester L. McAlister, died October 10, 1982 and Mavis M. (Reed) McAlister, died February 7, 2011 and her brother, Paul D. McAlister, died July 28, 2007.A Memorial Gathering will be held from 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Wednesday, March 6, 2019, at the Haskell & Morrison Funeral Home, 208 Ferry Street Vevay, Indiana 47043.In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to the Charles and Judy Firth Family Fund to benefit the Switzerland County YMCA % CFSCI, the Switzerland County Animal Shelter, or Charity of the Donor’s Choice. Cards are available at the funeral home or online at www.haskellandmorrison.comlast_img read more