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Star India to dedicate eight channels for Rio Olympics 2016

first_imgStar India on Thursday announced its coverage for the Rio 2016 Olympics by dedicating eight channels on a 24×7 basis, broadcast in English and Hindi.STREAM LIVE CONTENTTogether Star Sports and Hotstar will broadcast 3000+ hours of live content from the Olympics, which begins on August 5 in Brazil and will witness the largest ever Olympic contingent from India.ELITE PANEL FORMED Star Sports has also exclusively empaneled an elite panel of international & Indian Olympians as well as sports experts who will share, analyse and connect with the Indian viewers as live actions unfolds at the Olympics. This list  includes Australian swimmer Ian Thorpe, badminton legend Prakash Padukone, ace shooter Anjali Bhagwat, former Indian hockey captain Viren Rasquinha and swimmer Rehan Poncha. The presenters are Paula Malai Ali in English and Divya Jaitley in Hindi.  INCREASED USER INTERACTIONMoreover, Star’s video streaming platform Hotstar will roll out 14 live feeds consistently and up to 36 concurrent seeds at peak on the Olympics video player, available to users on demand through the event. Central to Hotstar’s offering to sports fans will be the rollout of an interactive, data rich Olympic player on the web where users will have the option to switch between the live feeds, have access to day wise listing of events and medals tally, and the ability to personalise the experience by following specific countries and sports disciplines.Also Read:  India hockey team addresses late goal concern to boost Rio hopeslast_img read more

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World Cup Teams To Train In Sydney

first_imgKingsway Playing Fields in St Marys will host the teams on Saturday, 21 May, while Doyle Ground in Parramatta will be the location of day two of the training camp on Sunday, 22 May. The camp is one of two camps to be held in Sydney in the coming weeks before the teams depart for Edinburgh, Scotland to take part in the 2011 Federation of International Touch (FIT) World Cup, which will be contested between Wednesday, 22 June and Sunday, 26 June 2011. Stay tuned to the website for all of the latest news and information from the camp.last_img read more

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10 months agoLiverpool midfielder Fabinho proud of Mane assist

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Fabinho proud of Mane assistby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool midfielder Fabinho is delighted after his assist for Sadio Mane’s opener in victory over Manchester United on Sunday.The Brazilian laid on his first goal for Liverpool before turning in a dominant display that led to an eventual 3-1 victory.“It’s a thing I always try to perfect, to train,” Fabinho said of his chipped pass. “I get a lot of [the] ball, in a position that normally the opponent’s defence is making the move outwards, and our attackers are getting in.“I saw Mane making the sign with his hand and I launched it.”It was a good pass.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Over 5000 voters opted for NOTA in UPs Muzaffarnagar

first_imgMuzaffarnagar (UP): Over 5,000 voters opted for the none of the above (NOTA) button in elections to the Muzaffarnagar parliamentary constituency in Uttar Pradesh, election officials said. Ten candidates were in the fray for Muzaffarnagar seat which was retained by BJP’s Sanjeev Kumar Balyan, who defeated his nearest rival and Rashtriya Lok Dal (RLD) chief Ajit Singh by 6,526 votes. According to the election officials, 5,061 voters opted for NOTA here. While Balyan secured 5,73,780 votes, Singh polled 5,67,254 votes. Independent candidate Neel Kumar got 4,884 votes — less than what was polled for NOTA.last_img read more

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Revival of forgotten era of Indian heritage fabrics

first_imgIndian chamber of commerce organised the ‘ICC Conference on Textiles & Apparel’ recently, which was followed by ‘Designer Round Table Conference’ and ‘ICC Apparel Awards’.The roundtable conference was attended by eminent designers who were particularly working with the Indian heritage fabrics and weaving and stitching techniques, and have brought them to the International dais. Personalities such as Abhishek Dutta, Fashion Designer; Bappaditya Biswas, Founder, Byloom; Rachit Agarwal, Co-Founder, Simaaya & Sasya Group; Chaitali Das, Social Entrepreneur and Managing Trustee, Rakshak Foundation; Agnimitra Paul, Fashion Designer; Shamlu Dudeja, Fashion Designer; and Sharbari Dutta, Fashion Designer deliberated on how the Indian fabrics and handlooms are being used so far, and what are the ways forward for their optimal utilisation and sustainability. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainThe conference was then followed by the awards. The winners in the ‘Best Men’s Clothing Brand’ was Turtle Limited, ‘Best Women’s Clothing Brand’ was Prapti Fashions, ‘Best Children’s Brand’ was Zero Clothing Co., and ‘Best Innerwear brand’ was Macho. Keshari Nath Tripathi, Governor of West Bengal was the Chief Guest of the session, who stated that West Bengal has immense potential in the apparels sector. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma Award”The state’s rich heritage fabrics such as cotton, jamdani, and expression of intricate artistry in Baluchari, Tangail, etc. positions the state to take its textiles sector to new heights,” said Tripathi. “Jute needs more attention as people are gradually becoming conscious of sustainable development goals and looking for alternatives to non-biodegradable materials. This is where West Bengal can utilize its comparative advantage in Jute to the full extent,” he further added. Wrapping up the series of events for the evening was the fashion show, which showcased designs of prominent fashion designers such as Agnimitra Paul; Shamlu Dudeja; Sharbari Dutta; Chaitali Das, Social Entrepreneur and Managing Trustee, Rakshak Foundation; and Lata Harlalka and Anwesha Harlalka. The designs were themed to be around sustainable fashion.last_img read more

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Pilotless planes on the horizon if public acceptance grows say experts

first_imgMONTREAL – Canadians may not be quite ready to fly on a pilotless aircraft but technological advances in self-driving vehicles are already opening the door to autonomous commercial flight, an increasingly attractive prospect for industry players facing a dearth of pilots.Aviation consultant Mike Doiron believes that pilotless flights will be viable in the next five to ten years, “but whether it’s acceptable to the general travelling public, that’ll be a whole different kettle of fish.”Montreal’s Bombardier Inc. is watching closely as rival Chicago-based Boeing Inc. and others in the industry invest in developing systems that could reduce the number of pilots from cockpits or remove them altogether, which could save the aerospace and airline industry US$35 billion annually, according to a recent UBS report.“Right now we feel that it’s a very effervescent area, mainly because of the renewed talk about urban air transport,” says Fassi Kafyeke, senior director strategic technology and innovation at Bombardier Aerospace, which is not currently working on any pilotless projects of its own.Around the world, pioneering startups are being gobbled up by big players. Boeing recently acquired Aurora Flight Sciences, a company that is developing autonomous flying vehicles.And Canadian researchers may soon dip their toes into the market at the Quebec-based Most21 supercluster, which is among nine finalists for federal financial support. The Mobility Systems and Technologies for the 21st Century proposal will focus on six areas of technology, including autonomy and on-demand mobility.In addition to saving on labour costs, pilotless planes could also reduce accidents caused by human error or fatigue at a time when pilot shortages are forcing smaller regional carriers to cancel flights.Canada will need to hire 7,300 pilots and flight inspectors between 2016 and 2025, according to an upcoming report from the Canadian Council for Aviation and Aerospace.The heavy cost of flight training, low starting salaries and lifestyle is causing the career to lose its appeal among Canadian youth.“When I was a kid, being a pilot was a pretty exciting career. Today young people have so many options out there that when they look at starting pay, risk-reward, conditions of employment, they have so many options,” said CCAA executive director Robert Donald.But aviation analyst Doiron believes the many years that would be required to get autonomous systems approved and in operation means the technology won’t solve the growing pilot shortage problem any time soon.However, the biggest challenge is getting passengers to match the industry’s enthusiasm.The UBS report published last August suggested that public perception of autonomous aircraft has long way to go, with only 17 per cent of those surveyed saying they were open to taking a pilotless flight.Although auto pilot is now used for all but a few minutes on most flights, passengers still place their faith in the presence of trained pilots in the cockpit.“What makes a good pilot is judgment in critical situations, something an auto pilot can’t replace,” said flight training provider CAE Inc. spokeswoman Pascale Alpha, adding that pilotless commercial planes will take time to develop and gain public acceptance.Capt. Dan Adamus, president of the Air Line Pilots Association in Canada, said pilots have embraced technology but are irreplaceable to address problems that can arise with even the most advanced computer systems.“We’re nowhere even close to a point where we believe passengers are willing to trade safety for a cheaper aviation system,” he said.However, artificial intelligence-based avionics systems will eventually be capable of responding to all possible flight scenarios, said Tom Irvine of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.Public acceptance will also come as unmanned drones are increasingly used for law enforcement and monitoring of agriculture, natural resources and wild fires, Irvine added.“As long as the safety record holds up…people will start to understand that this technology works as advertised.”In addition to a lack of public acceptance, the transition to autonomous planes could be delayed by lengthy regulatory approvals and required changes to air traffic control.Transport Canada said discussions about this emerging technology are “in their early stages.”Millennials are less negative about the idea than older people but no group of Americans is positive about pilotless flights, said Stephen Rice, a professor at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University who has conducted research on autonomous commercial flights.“The airline industry is going to take a lot longer than the cars but I cannot see a future without it.”Follow @RossMarowits on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX:BBD.B, TSX:CAE, NYSE:BA)Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version incorrectly identified Tim Risen of AIAA. In fact, the person is Tom Irvinelast_img read more

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Canada Post Union to file constitutional challenge

first_imgOTTAWA – The union representing Canada Post employees is taking the Trudeau government to court over the legislation that ended rotating strikes by its members.The Canadian Union of Postal Workers said it will file a constitutional challenge Tuesday in Ontario Superior Court, arguing Bill C-89 violated the rights of workers to collective bargaining.The move comes one day after the government appointed a mediator to bring the labour dispute to an end.CUPW national president Mike Palecek said the government can’t legislate labour peace.The union’s lawyer said the back-to-work legislation was passed after Canada Post created a “false emergency” over a backlog of parcels at the Crown corporation’s sorting plants.Canada Post said Monday that, while letter mail is moving well, parcel deliveries are sporadic and delivery delays are expected through January as a result of the rotating walkouts thatended Nov. 27.last_img read more

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Waste not — organics recycling at Brock

Are you going to finish that? If not, new efforts at Brock will ensure that your food scraps wind up in the compost heap rather than landfill. According to a 2011 Brock waste audit report, close to 50 per cent of all waste that the University sends to landfill is organic material.Although organic waste is the largest contributor to the waste stream, everything from food scraps (including meat, fish and bones) to sandwich and fruit leftovers, to coffee grounds and tea bags, are compostable and can be recycled at the University.In order to get the word out about organics recycling at Brock, custodial services and food services staff in conjunction with the University’s Sustainability Co-ordinating Committee have partnered to make it easy for everyone to chip in and help out.“This is an area where the individual user can help the University to achieve a higher waste diversion rate,” says Domenic Maniccia, director of custodial services. “We’re looking to encourage a culture of organic recycling here at Brock.“The biggest opportunity to capture organic waste at the University is definitely in our eating areas – dining halls, food services areas, kitchens and lounges,” he adds.“The concern is not so much behind the counter because dining services is already doing a good job of recycling organics in kitchens and prep areas. Our focus is on what the end user is doing with food scraps.”In an effort to improve the University’s organic capture rate, several initiatives have been put in place.Organics recycling bins are available for all department and faculty lounges and kitchens on campus. Bins are lined with biodegradable bags and are maintained by custodial staff. This program was launched as a trial in Schmon Tower in Fall 2011 and was rolled out campus-wide in Spring 2012.Many of the recognizable green bins are already in place in lounges and kitchens. If your area does not have one and you would like to request one, you can do so by contacting Custodial Services at x3508.View a list of what can and can’t be placed in organics collection bins. Coffee cup recycling at Brock was introduced in 2009. These are not part of the organics recycling program and are collected separately. They can be disposed of in marked containers where coffee is sold on campus.Also this September, garbage cans were removed from Market Hall in an effort to better capture and separate organics and other recyclable materials. Patrons are now asked to leave their leftover food scraps and garbage on their cafeteria trays and to place them on the conveyor belt for sorting.Other food areas on campus, such as Lowenberger and DeCew dining halls for example, still rely on patrons to separate waste into the various recycling and waste bins.“Takeout containers are also one of our biggest challenges,” Maniccia says. “So whether you bring your food back to your office, or you’re eating in the cafeteria or on the run, find one of these organic waste bins and throw your food scraps there.”In 2010, Brock generated 620,000 kilograms of organic waste and 448,000 kilograms of that waste was composted (72 per cent organics recycling rate). That year, the University’s overall rate of diverting waste from landfill was 79 per cent.In 2011, Brock generated 578,000 kilograms of organic waste and 351,000 kilograms were composted (61 per cent organics recycling rate). There was an increase in the total amount of waste generated at the institution between 2010 and 2011, and the overall waste diversion rate for the University dropped to 73 per cent. However, this increase can be attributed to the sizeable reported decrease in organic waste that was composted.“Basically, that’s where our 6 per cent overall drop originated from,” Maniccia says. “Our goal for this year is to get our diversion rate back up to where it was in 2010.”View the Waste Recycling Resource Guide – everything that is recyclable at Brock read more

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Catchup Wednesday 3 midweek longreads

first_imgIT’S MIDWAY THROUGH the week and you want to get up to speed on the latest news topics and catch up on opinions and insights.We’re here to help you do just that, with our three midweek longreads:1. Life with Bell’s palsyIn 2012, BBC’s Shanghai correspondent, John Sudworth, woke up with Bell’s palsy, which left one half of his face frozen and unable to move. A year on from his diagnosis, he writes about his journey back to full health.BBC, approximately 6 minutes reading time, 1326 words Shortly after the onset of my Bell’s palsy, in October last year, I wrote about my decision to carry on working as a BBC TV reporter. The response was overwhelming, with many, many fellow sufferers writing to tell me about their experience coping with this facially disfiguring and deeply distressing condition. 2. History of the AfroThe history of the Afro is laced with personal and political stories, heavy with the weight of history and revolution. Steven Thrasher looks at how the Afro worn by the son of a New York City mayoral candidate shows the different approach to hair taken by the Obamas, and takes us on a journey through the political history of the ‘fro.Buzzfeed, approximately 19 minutes reading time, 3800 wordsBut by the ’60s, young black activists deemed King’s techniques too slow and too accommodating. And just as with white hippies, hair length became a way for black youth to rebel against their elders. The youth-led Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and Stokely Carmichael started to strain against the ways of King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In wanting action, they increasingly rejected their predecessors’ strategy of respectability3. Boycott Russia or notThere has been much talk about the Sochi Winter Olympics, and they fact they are due to be held in Russia, where LGBT communities are under increased pressure. While some have advocated that the games be boycotted to express opposition to Russia’s stance on gay ‘propaganda’, Igor Yassin argues that a boycott would make things more difficult for LGBT people.TheJournal.ie, approximately 5 minutes reading time, 1044 wordsUnfortunately, as LGBT people become more visible and more vocal about challenging discrimination and seeking equal rights, there has been an increase in attacks on LGBT people by far-right groups –violence that the police often fail to investigate. I myself was attacked by a homophobic gang while protesting outside the Duma with a group of other LGBT campaigners, and my nose was broken. Even though the police caught the men who attacked me, they were released without any charge.Want some more longreads? Then check out Sitdown Sunday>last_img read more

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Business magazine compares Angela Merkel to Hitler in ad

first_img See how smoggy downtown LA was the day before Trump is expected to demolish California’s attempts to tackle auto emissions Ads of the WorldBerlusconi gets off slightly easier — he is only compared to a Chippendale’s dancer.JWT Buenos Aires has created marketing campaigns for Mercado in the past and made this ad series as well.- Laura StamplerFord India apologises for ad image of women gagged in car>1982: Women’s bodies used to sell ‘everything from cars to chocolate bars’>Are these the most irritating Irish ads ever?> 16-year-old Greta Thunberg met with Obama and chided senators, saying they’re not trying hard enough to fight climate change A SMALL BUSINESS journal, Mercado Magazine, just released a series of advertisements that is begging to drum up some controversy.One ad asks viewers to “Understand and make your own Merkel,” visually indicating that Greeks view her as Hitler (presumably due to deficit debates — Greeks did greet Merkel in Nazi uniforms when she visited Athens last year), Spaniards see her as Mother Theresa (again, presumably due to the Spanish bailout.) 10 things in tech you need to know today A car plowed through the main hall of Trump Plaza in New Rochelle, New York Ads of the WorldPosing any politician, particularly a German one, hailing is undoubtedly meant to offend.The same stereotypes are given to the Pope. Catholics see him as he is, Muslims don’t see him at all, homosexuals see him as a club wielding cave man, and the rest of the world see him as a blank slate.last_img read more

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Découverte en Aveyron dhommes venus du ProcheOrient il y a 5000 ans

first_imgDécouverte en Aveyron d’hommes venus du Proche-Orient il y a 5.000 ansDes chercheurs français ont découvert que des hommes venant du Proche-Orient vivaient en Aveyron il y a environ 5.000 ans. Une conclusion émise après l’analyse d’ADN prélevé sur des dents datant de l’ère néolithique.Des dents provenant de crânes découverts dans la grotte de Treilles, dans l’Aveyron, ont permis de révéler la présence dans la région il y a 5.000 ans, d’hommes venus du Proche-Orient. L’analyse ADN des dents a en effet montré que “la majorité des sujets inhumés étaient des hommes descendant d’un seul et même ancêtre” venant du Proche-Orient, et “probablement d’Anatolie”, a expliqué Francis Duranthon, le directeur du Muséum d’Histoire naturelle de Toulouse où étaient conservés les ossements.À lire aussiL’étrange cas de Taylor Muhl, cette Américaine qui a fusionné avec sa soeur jumelle avant sa naissanceLes résultats de cette étude ont été publiés dans la revue scientifique américaine PNAS. La sépulture de Treilles a été découverte les années 1930. Près de 150 corps y ont été retrouvés, tous ayant été inhumés sur une période d’un à deux siècles il y a 5.000 ans. Les dents de 24 personnes ont permis d’identifier 22 hommes. Trois d’entre eux étaient de proches parents et seize descendaient du même lignage paternel. Les chercheurs du CNRS, de l’université Paul Sabatier de Toulouse et de l’université de Strasbourg, estiment que les 150 personnes retrouvées dans la sépulture de Treilles faisaient partie d’un clan.Pour Francis Duranthan, cette découverte confirme “l’importance des mouvements de populations pendant le néolithique le long des côtes méditerranéennes”. Jusqu’alors, les scientifiques disposaient de certains éléments, tels que des céramiques, suggérant une telle migration. “Mais ici, on le sait par la génétique”, s’enthousiasme le chercheur.Le 2 juin 2011 à 09:29 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Twin Peaks releases teaser video

first_img We’re supposed to get the third season of Twin Peaks in 2017, but besides a full cast list, we have no idea what’s going to happen.Adding more mystery to the already mysterious… mystery is a new teaser video released on Friday that showcases the famous theme music and a cryptic image familiar to fans of the original series.Angelo Badalamenti, who composed the original theme, is depicted in the video playing the classic theme, his image overlaid with a slow pan through the trees.This goes on for a few seconds before we spot an iconic picture: Laura Palmer’s senior photo.So far we haven’t seen much of anything about the newest season: just a few more vague teasers that show off atmosphere or location.The cast list only serves to confuse us more. Many series regulars are coming back (such as Kyle Maclachlan as Agent Cooper,  David Duchovny, and Harry Dean Stanton), but also a number of new actors, including Michael Cera, Amanda Seyfried, Naomi Watts, and so many more.Here’s hoping that the next teaser is as cryptic as this one. We almost don’t want to know what’s going to happen. T-Shirt Tuesday: Best Twin Peaks ShirtsTwin Peaks Returned With a David Lynch Horror Movie Stay on targetlast_img read more

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Barnes Noble Digital Newsstand Passes 650000 Periodical Downloads

first_imgWhile publishers and Apple haggle over the pending launch of a digital newsstand, Barnes & Noble took the opportunity to remind everyone that it not only has a functional newsstand, but it’s chugging right along. The bookseller says that its NOOKnewsstand has surpassed 650,000 digital single copy and subscription sales in the last two months.Sales were spurred by the launch of the NOOKcolor two months ago. B&N says its digital periodical sales are “exceeding expectations,” driven largely by owners of the $250 device.The company says it has added about 12 new titles in the last month including O, The Oprah Magazine, Food Network Magazine, Martha Stewart Weddings, Guitar World and Consumer Reports ShopSmart. The total number of available titles now hovers around 120 magazines and newspapers.The post-Christmas timeframe also impacted sales. B&N says 150 percent more subscriptions were ordered during that time than over the previous 12 months. “We are excited to offer a wide array of top periodicals and have seen explosive growth in NOOKnewsstand sales since the launch of NOOKcolor,” said Jonathan Shar, vice president and general manager of digital newsstand at B&N. Shar was hired away from Time Inc. last March, where he was vice president and GM of CNNMoney.com. At the time, BN.com’s digital periodical offerings were much lighter, about 20 newspapers and 11 magazines. According to B&N, best-selling magazines include Us Weekly, Cosmopolitan, National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Maxim and Women’s Health, among others.last_img read more

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Ella Mai On Bood Up Her Dream Collab Lauryn Hill More

first_imgNews Ella Mai On “Boo’d Up,” Lauryn Hill & More ella-mai-bood-her-dream-collab-lauryn-hill-more The soulful songstress shares about the positive impact of her hit single back home, her biggest influences, how she’d love to work with Khalid, and moreAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Sep 27, 2018 – 2:26 pm British R&B sensation Ella Mai started building an excited buzz around her name earlier this year, as her incredibly catchy “Boo’d Up” was one of the biggest songs of the summer in the U.S. and had us singing along to her angelic vocals. This is just the beginning for the soulful singer/songwriter, whose debut self-titled studio album comes out on Oct. 12. Facebook Mae sat down with the Recording Academy to tell us a little more about the positive effects of the success of “Boo’d Up” instilling hometown pride in London, how she’d love to work with Khalid (who had a cameo in the song’s music video), how her style is very inspired by the ’90s and early-2000s, and a bit about her new music.She also explains how impactful growing up listening to The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill was to her, and how thrilled she is about the excitement around the 20 year anniversary of Lauryn Hill’s iconic album. “That album is everything, it’s my favorite album of all time,” she shares. “I don’t think there’s a project that beats it, and she’s so raw and authentic.”Essence Fest: 7 Female R&B Acts You Need To KnowRead more NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Sep 27, 2018 – 2:19 pm Ella Mai On Feeling Proud Of “Boo’d Up” & More Email Twitter Ella Mai On “Boo’d Up,” Her Dream Collab, Lauryn Hill & More last_img read more

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Sweden to reopen a rape case against Julian Assange

first_img Comments Share your voice Security Tags 25 Photos Julian Assange WikiLeaks 1:26 Now playing: Watch this:center_img 2 WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange faces a reopened Swedish rape investigation. Daniel Leal-Olivas /AFP/Getty Images Swedish authorities will reopen an investigation into a rape allegation against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.The inquiry was revived at the request of the alleged victim’s lawyer, the BBC reported Monday. The investigation began after two women in 2010 accused Assange (who was living in London) of sexually assaulting them while in Stockholm for a WikiLeaks conference. Assange has long denied the allegation.He is currently serving a 50-week sentence in British jail for skipping bail in 2012. He was arrested immediately after he was forced to leave the Ecuadorian Embassy in London last month. Inside Julian Assange’s office In the wake of his arrest, Elisabeth Massi Fritz, a lawyer for one of the alleged victims, tweeted about their efforts to get the Swedish investigation reopened.”No rape victim should have to wait nine years to see justice be served,” she wrote.Since the US has already kicked off the extradition process on the conspiracy charge, British officials “will decide on the order of priority,” according to the Swedish Prosecution Authority. Earlier this month, Assange refused to surrender to a US extradition request during a London hearing.Neither WikiLeaks, Assange’s lawyer nor the US Justice Department immediately responded to a request for comment.First published at 2:53 a.m. PT.Updated at 3:55 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. After Julian Assange’s arrest, the US DoJ piles on He’d lived there for nearly seven years to avoid being extradited to Sweden over the nine-year-old allegations and later to the US for his alleged role in a massive leak of classified materials, which the US Justice Department called “one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States.”Sweden dropped the investigation in 2017 because it couldn’t proceed while Assange remained in the embassy, but prosecutors noted at the time that they hadn’t cleared him. last_img read more

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Were still not safe Nome reckons with sex assaults

first_imgFront Street in Nome. January, 2018 (Photo: Zachariah Hughes – Alaska Public Media, Nome)For months, the town of Nome has been in turmoil. In a place that holds tight to discretion, long-simmering frustrations over how the police department handles sexual assault allegations and investigations have been airing publicly, commanding attention and prompting a local reckoning.Now, major reforms are taking place. The city government is even joining a call for federal officials to investigate the conduct of its own police department.Advocates spent years laying the groundwork for changes that are now starting to materialize. And they say they’re not done.On a November afternoon inside her tidy second-story apartment, Clarice “Bun” Hardy sipped a cup of coffee.In 2015, Hardy started working as a dispatcher with the Nome Police Department.“I loved it,” she explained. Sociable and well-connected, Hardy, who is Alaska Native, took a certain professional delight in handling missing person calls. “I’d have that person tracked down in like ten, fifteen minutes. It’s just something I loved to do.”“But I don’t think I could ever go back there,” she added.In March of 2017, Hardy says she was drugged and sexually assaulted. She was at a bar, halfway through a second drink before she blacked out. The next day she woke up in just a T-shirt, no idea how she got home or why she was in pain. Eventually, she found her phone under the couch, the battery dead.Breakers Bar on Nome’s Front Street, where Hardy says she was mid-way through a second drink when she blacked out March of 2017. She thinks she was drugged, and says she has almost no memory of the rest of the night (Photo: Zachariah Hughes – Alaska Public Media, Nome).“I got it charged, and that’s when my Snapchat just started blowing up,” Hardy said. In messages and voicemails, people kept asking if she was OK, and whether she had seen the video.Hardy was confused. “I’m like, ‘what video?’”Hardy believes that her assailant’s girlfriend broke into her apartment and took a video of the assault, putting it on social media soon after. She said it circulated for a few hours before being taken down. Hardy was horrified. She reported what happened to a colleague at work, Lieutenant Nick Harvey, who told her he’d investigate.Over the next few months, Hardy would ask Harvey about the status of the case, always getting the “same answer: ‘I’m working it,’” she recalled.But Hardy grew increasingly frustrated by what seemed like a total lack of progress.Eventually, she says, she started asking people she knew had seen the original video clip whether police investigators had followed up with them. Nobody had.“There was no report. He never talked to anyone,” Hardy said.Even though Hardy was a member of Nome’s small police department at the time, her case languished for more than a year.Harvey did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Earlier this year he was demoted from a lieutenant to a sergeant at NPD.Hardy’s story isn’t unique.For years, a group of mostly Alaska Native women in Nome was meeting. It started informally over dinners, sharing stories about sexual assaults they had lived through or heard about from friends and family.“Nobody would get calls back from the police department, nobody would get any follow up,” Lisa Navraq Ellanna said. “Nothing. Not one darn thing.”Ellanna hosted those first meals around her kitchen table, and eventually, the group solicited more stories from women around town, and from cab-drivers and bartenders. To them, it seemed like NPD didn’t treat assault allegations seriously if a woman said she was drinking or in a bar beforehand.“We started to hear this pattern of how the police department was not responding, was not investigating, was not following through, was not seeking justice on behalf of the victims,” Ellanna said.“This is years in the making,” said Darlene Paqpaluk Trigg, Ellanna’s friend and co-organizer, sitting beside her at the edge of a gathering room in a cultural center. Though ongoing national conversations around sexual harassment and assault have affected discussions in Nome, Trigg cautioned against placing too much emphasis on them as catalysts for what’s played out around town.“This is something that existed here prior to any of it being called out on the national scale,” Trigg added.An important chapter in Nome’s reckoning started in May, when Trigg and Ellanna were part of a group of about 20 women that showed up at a city meeting with a document. It outlined more than a dozen changes they wanted the city and police department to make in their handling sexual assaults. One was more training for officers who do interviews in assault cases. Another was better trauma response, and a third was cultural orientation for police new to the Bering Strait region.As the summer wore on, the typically sleepy council meetings were packed and the conversation grew heated.In the women’s estimation, nothing changed. So this fall, advocates started running for local offices.Trigg, a first time candidate, ran for a seat on the local school board, on a platform of improving racial equity. A 28-year-old lawyer, Meghan Sigvanna Topkok, landed a seat on the city council.“I wanted to see more Native voices,” Topkok said. “I was particularly concerned about domestic violence and sexual assault, and how it’s handled in our city. So I wanted to be part of how we’re going to move forward with that.”Topkok knows firsthand what it means to mistrust the police department. She says that’s part of what kept her from reporting her own sexual assault after it happened in 2013, the same year she moved back to town after college.“It was easier to just keep that to myself and not talk about it,” she said. “I still don’t talk about it very often.”Though Nome is about half Alaska Native, for years, the six members of the town’s city council have been almost exclusively white and male. This fall, Topkok is one of the council’s two women.From her vantage point as an attorney and a council member, Topkok said the police department’s problems stem from its budget.“Some of it just comes back to the fact that we’re very understaffed,” Topkok said. “I also think that our police officers are underpaid for the amount of work that they have to do.”This is a point almost everyone agrees on. Nome is a regional hub with the only bars and liquor stores for hundreds of miles in almost every direction. The volume of calls to emergency responders for help is staggering, with a huge share of them related to alcohol. The police force is small, often only able to field a single officer on each patrol shift, leaving little or no time for follow ups, investigations or community policing. One officer recently made nine arrests in a single shift, according to the department’s current head.There is disagreement, however, about the performance of the previous police chief, John Papasodora.Community advocates critical of Papasodora say he repeatedly turned away resources and offers for more training and personnel, like grant money from third-party groups. Papasodora declined a request for an interview, but he wrote in an email, “the performance of the department has been scrutinized and changes were implemented to address the issues.”Ellanna and Hardy, among others, say that racism as a problem within the department’s upper ranks. Those claims have revived memories of the 2003 case of Matthew Owens, a white Nome police officer convicted of abducting and killing 19-year-old Sonya Ivanoff.The tragedy remains a “stain on the community,” according to Melanie Bahnke, president of the regional non-profit Kawerak.“That memory doesn’t go away,” Bahnke said in her office. “A young Alaska Native woman was murdered at the hands of the Nome Police Department. It’s like pulling off a scab.”In November, Kawerak asked the Justice Department to independently investigate whether there was a pattern of NPD ignoring sexual assault claims by NPD. In a new step, the City of Nome signed onto the same letter, agreeing to let federal officials look into local policing practices.Anchorage FBI spokeswoman Staci Feger-Pellessier said the bureau has received the request from Nome, but would not comment on whether an investigation is open.Now, Nome has a few new leaders in key positions. One of main targets of activists’ frustration this summer was the city manager, Tom Moran, who they felt was not doing enough to hold the police department accountable. Moran was pushed out of his job a few days before the end of his contract in October.Moran said that what might have seemed like inaction was in fact a difficult balancing act between transparency and respecting confidentiality in sensitive investigations and personnel matters. But he also acknowledged lapses.“There were a lot of open cases that probably should have been tied up and packaged and sent off to the district attorney, and they hadn’t been,” Moran said during a November interview. “The main question was why this was being allowed to transpire.”He pointed to gaps in training and staffing at NPD as a prime reason, as well as an insufficient budget for expanding public safety services.Leaders in Nome say the city is responding to those and other problems. The new police chief, Bob Estes, says he is committed to rebuilding the department, in part by incorporating more community input and hiring more officers. The new interim city manager, John Handeland, grew up in Nome, has deep ties there and supports the request for a federal investigation.“I’ve heard personal stories from folks of cases and incidents where they feel that their claims were not taken seriously,” Handeland said. “I tend to agree with some of them.”For their part, activists worry that a few early reforms will allow deeper problems to go unresolved. City meetings have cooled off, with much sparser attendance. An early demand to set up a community advisory board to oversee the police department sounded at first like it was a sure thing. Now, according to Ellanna, the city council seems less committed. She worries that with less pressure on elected leaders, momentum will slow.For Trigg, the fundamental problem remains firmly in place: Women in Nome are still not safe.“When you have an investigation that comes back with conclusions and recommendations, that’s when you’re able to say ‘progress.’ Implementation of those recommendations: that’s progress,” Trigg listed off.“Taking the bad characters out of the equation: that’s just doing what’s right,” she added.One important change that has already taken root: the last few months of organizing have brought more personal stories of sexual assault out into public. Trigg and others say that is diminishing some of the long-standing stigma and isolation that used to come with keeping silent.last_img read more

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Modi afraid of defeat CM

first_imgSuri/Durgapur: Coming down heavily on Narendra Modi, Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee said his body language clearly shows he is suffering from a fear of defeat. She reiterated that the BJP will not get a single seat in Bengal in the ensuing Lok Sabha elections.”The more Modi comes to Bengal for his campaigns, the better it is for the Trinamool Congress as it will then get more seats in the polls,” she said adding that the people are sick and tired of Modi and wants a change. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataBanerjee addressed two political meetings at Suri and Durgapur respectively on Thursday. Referring to an interview where Modi said that she sends kurtas to him, she said: “I send gifts to many important dignitaries. It is our courtesy. This has nothing to do with politics. I send kurtas produced by the weavers associated with Biswa Bangla stores to several people. I also send mangoes to many. He is so shameless that he has said this during an interview,” she said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state”Marketing a gesture of courtesy is not conducive to democracy,” Banerjee added and said she normally wrote letters on birthdays to everyone. “PM Modi has said I send him kurtas. Where is the problem? We send gifts to all during Durga Puja,” she maintained. Referring to a well-known story from the Panchatantra, she said: “A rat approached a hermit and complained that he felt threatened by a jackal. The hermit immediately transformed the rat into a jackal to save him from being killed. Subsequently, the hermit transformed the rat into other animals including a lion. Once he became a lion he tried to attack the hermit. The hermit immediately brought him back to a rat.” Drawing a parallel with Modi, she said: “He will be brought back to a ‘chaiwalla’ after the elections.” Terming Modi a “liar whose sole business is to misinform people” she said: “He is so shameless that during an election meeting held on Wednesday he had said that I do not allow Durga Puja to take place in Bengal. Lakhs of community Durga Pujas are held throughout the state. You should do your homework before making such comments,” he said. Banerjee further stated: “It has become Modi’s habit to come to Bengal and call me a goon. I have fought against the CPI(M)’s goons and I am not scared of Modi,” she said. “We have not forgotten the communal riots in Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh and the killings at Godhra. It is really amazing that a man whose hands are blood-soaked, he is now calling me a goon.” The TMC supremo maintained that BJP leaders are coming to Bengal as they have realised that “they will lose in Uttar Pradesh, Punjab and in the South Indian states. They will get zero seats in Bengal.” Banerjee maintained that despite deploying crores of Central Forces, “BJP cannot win the election as people are with the Trinamool Congress.” She said in 10 seats in which the Lok Sabha elections have been held in North Bengal, the Trinamool Congress will win all of them. “This time, we will get 42 out of 42. BJP leaders are like migratory birds. They come only before the elections and vanish like camphor after the polls are over.” She urged people to cast their votes in favour of party nominees — Asit Mal and Shatabdi Roy in Bolpur and Birbhum seats and Mumtaz Sanghamita in Burdwan-Durgapur seat.last_img read more

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In Castros home region Pope Francis praises Church sacrifices

first_imgRelated posts:Pope Francis meets the Castros after mass on iconic Havana square When Pope Francis visits Cuba, he’ll find many priests aren’t Cuban Cuban Americans make pilgrimages to see Pope Francis in their native land Pope Francis tells bishops that clergy abuse must not be repeated HOLGUÍN, Cuba –Pope Francis on Monday praised the sacrifices made by Cuba’s Catholic Church to work on the island as he visited the home region of communist leaders Fidel and Raúl Castro.Tens of thousands of fans and faithful braved the tropical heat to attend an open-air mass by the first Latin American pope, whose role in brokering the thaw in relations between Cuba and the United States has made him immensely popular on the island.“I know the efforts and the sacrifices being made by the Church in Cuba to bring Christ’s word and presence to all, even in the most remote areas,” Pope Francis told the packed square in the eastern city of Holguín, his second stop on an eight-day, six-city tour that will also take him to the United States.Cuba’s Church has slowly gained a prominent role in social welfare programs on the island after years of hostilities with former leader Fidel Castro’s regime, which was officially atheist for more than three decades. Catholic nuns attend Pope Francis’ morning mass at the Calixto García square in Holguín, in eastern Cuba, on Sept. 21, 2015. AFP/Pool/Tony GentileIt has also taken on the part of mediator with Castro’s brother and successor Raúl, who took power in 2006, as he undertakes tentative reforms.Pope Francis himself met Fidel Castro, 89, at his home in Havana on Sunday, before holding a closed-door meeting with Raúl, 84, at the government’s headquarters.But the Church still faces numerous problems in Cuba. It struggles to recruit clergy in a country where only 10 percent of the population describes itself as Catholic. Half the island’s priests are foreigners. It also relies heavily on donations from abroad to do its work in the deeply impoverished country, and is still banned from operating Catholic schools. People cheer as Pope Francis arrives to give a morning mass at the Calixto García square in Holguín, in eastern Cuba, on Sept. 21, 2015. Rodrigo Arangua/AFPPope Francis and GuantanamoAmong the faithful gathered in Holguín, hundreds had made a seven-hour trek by bus from the eastern province of Guantanamo, the site of the U.S. Naval base and detention center that is one of the most delicate issues in ongoing negotiations between Havana and Washington. Cuba has long called for the return of the base, which the United States rents for $4,085 a month under a permanent lease granted in a 1903 treaty.“We want to ask the pope for peace, tranquility, unity around the world and to help us get back the base,” said 54-year-old builder Noel Pérez from the town of Caimanera, near the base.“Francis is the third pope to visit us in Cuba, but the first Latin American, and he can help us get back the base,” said Norales Mendoza, 45, from Arroyo Hondo de Paraguay in Guantanamo province.Holguín is the only stop on Pope Francis’ trip that has never received a papal visit. It is known for a cross that has overlooked the city from a hilltop since a Franciscan monk hauled it up there in 1790 — though the original wooden version succumbed to old age and the 1950 replacement was destroyed by lightning.Pope Francis was later due to visit the five-meter (16-foot) cross, now made of concrete, to bless the city of 291,000 inhabitants, Cuba’s fourth-largest.After his seven-hour stop in Holguín, the pope takes off for Santiago, the country’s second city — dubbed “the heroic city” by the communist regime because Fidel Castro declared there on Jan. 1, 1959 that his revolution had toppled dictator Fulgencio Batista. A woman waits for the start of Pope Francis’ morning mass at the Calixto García square in Holguín, in eastern Cuba, on Sept. 21, 2015. Rodrigo Arangua/AFPVatican and dissidentsFrancis arrived Saturday afternoon and headed into a packed itinerary Sunday. He delivered mass to hundreds of thousands of people on Havana’s Revolution Square, met both Castro brothers, gave an off-the-script speech to local clergy and then addressed a crowd of young Cubans — all in the tropical heat.At his morning mass in Havana, three Cuban dissidents were arrested as they approached Francis shouting “Freedom!” when he arrived in his “Popemobile.” Cuba bans opposition groups and routinely arrests dissidents who try to protest. Several leading dissidents have criticized the pope for not accepting their requests to meet him during his visit.Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi told journalists that Vatican officials had in fact been in contact with some dissidents, but that they had not managed to arrange a meeting.The pope will leave from Santiago Tuesday for the United States, where his itinerary includes stops at the White House, the U.S. Congress and the United Nations General Assembly.Read more about Everyone’s Favorite Pope here Facebook Commentslast_img read more